Analog Pitching - Accuracy Tip

SDS

This might be well-known, but I haven't seen it mentioned, so I figure it's worth posting.

One issue which I have had in the past while using analog pitching was stick drift on the way up, particularly when using pitchers who have long deliveries. Recently, I found a solution to this issue which doesn't necessitate using the thumb and another finger to steady the stick.

Starting the delivery requires only the slightest movement downward, and the delivery will continue as long as the stick isn't moved upward until the desired release point. It took a little while to break the habit of bringing the stick all the way down and then sending it up to pitch, but making the change has been very helpful, increasing my accuracy a great deal by negating the occasional pitch which sails off-target due to stick drift on the way up.

SDS

Oh well good to know cause i jam'er down all the way to the yellow bar everytime hahah

SDS

This is a useful thread. Thank you for sharing

SDS

@Onyx_Hokie_2 said in Analog Pitching - Accuracy Tip:

This might be well-known, but I haven't seen it mentioned, so I figure it's worth posting.

One issue which I have had in the past while using analog pitching was stick drift on the way up, particularly when using pitchers who have long deliveries. Recently, I found a solution to this issue which doesn't necessitate using the thumb and another finger to steady the stick.

Starting the delivery requires only the slightest movement downward, and the delivery will continue as long as the stick isn't moved upward until the desired release point. It took a little while to break the habit of bringing the stick all the way down and then sending it up to pitch, but making the change has been very helpful, increasing my accuracy a great deal by negating the occasional pitch which sails off-target due to stick drift on the way up.

So after you start the pitch you just let it come to rest back to its origin before you push up for timing? I've been dabbling with analog off and on and walk too many batters because of bad upward movement from all the way jammed down.

SDS

I figured it out. So far this has made a huge difference for me. I have watched a couple different pitching tips videos and have never come across this specific tip. Thanks for the heads up. Much appreciated.

SDS

@Onyx_Hokie_2 said in Analog Pitching - Accuracy Tip:

This might be well-known, but I haven't seen it mentioned, so I figure it's worth posting.

One issue which I have had in the past while using analog pitching was stick drift on the way up, particularly when using pitchers who have long deliveries. Recently, I found a solution to this issue which doesn't necessitate using the thumb and another finger to steady the stick.

Starting the delivery requires only the slightest movement downward, and the delivery will continue as long as the stick isn't moved upward until the desired release point. It took a little while to break the habit of bringing the stick all the way down and then sending it up to pitch, but making the change has been very helpful, increasing my accuracy a great deal by negating the occasional pitch which sails off-target due to stick drift on the way up.

Thank you, I've never heard this tip before. I'll give it a try.

SDS

@Warpedzilla said in Analog Pitching - Accuracy Tip:

So after you start the pitch you just let it come to rest back to its origin before you push up for timing?

I know that you figured it out, but your reply makes me think that perhaps I wasn't clear enough in my original post, so I've added the explanation below:

  • When the stick is at rest, it is at position 0, 0 in graphical terms (x, y).
  • All the way down (and straight) is at 0, 100 and all the way up (and straight) is at 0, -100.
  • The threshold for starting a delivery is at about 0, 5 or a bit lower, maybe 0, 10.
  • Once the delivery starts, simply holding the stick in the position at which is started will allow the delivery to continue until you push the stick upward to release the pitch.

If we consider a full down to full up stick movement to be traveling through 200 units of space in order to release the pitch, by using the method above the stick travels through only 105-110 units, lessening the time and distance through which the stick has to move in order to release the pitch.

SDS

Okay, so I'm not going crazy, i figured this out a few weeks ago and have used it here and there when I'm struggling with accuracy.

The only thing I've noticed is i get varying results of pitch effectiveness with this. I tend to get more yellow than red, but maybe that's just me being too cautious? Have you experienced less pitch power with this?

SDS

@notoriousHEB said in Analog Pitching - Accuracy Tip:

Okay, so I'm not going crazy, i figured this out a few weeks ago and have used it here and there when I'm struggling with accuracy.

The only thing I've noticed is i get varying results of pitch effectiveness with this. I tend to get more yellow than red, but maybe that's just me being too cautious? Have you experienced less pitch power with this?

Can you explain this yellow/red thing? I do notice different colors on the meter when I pitch but no clue what they mean lol

SDS

@aaronjw76 said in Analog Pitching - Accuracy Tip:

@notoriousHEB said in Analog Pitching - Accuracy Tip:

Okay, so I'm not going crazy, i figured this out a few weeks ago and have used it here and there when I'm struggling with accuracy.

The only thing I've noticed is i get varying results of pitch effectiveness with this. I tend to get more yellow than red, but maybe that's just me being too cautious? Have you experienced less pitch power with this?

Can you explain this yellow/red thing? I do notice different colors on the meter when I pitch but no clue what they mean lol

That's the pitch effectiveness/power/effort whatever you want to call it. So when you pitch meter you know how you can select your pitch power maxed out in the red for more effectiveness (harder fastball) or early in the yellow saving stamina? Same thing holds true for analog except it is determined by how quickly you flick the stick and your meter turns the color of the pitch power yellow (min) orange (moderate) or red (max)

SDS

@notoriousHEB said in Analog Pitching - Accuracy Tip:

Okay, so I'm not going crazy, i figured this out a few weeks ago and have used it here and there when I'm struggling with accuracy.

The only thing I've noticed is i get varying results of pitch effectiveness with this. I tend to get more yellow than red, but maybe that's just me being too cautious? Have you experienced less pitch power with this?

From what I have seen, the Oomph Meter is affected by the force of the delivery - the upward movement - as opposed to the start of the pitching motion - the downward stick movement.

In fact, one reason that I worked on this involved trying for more accuracy while moving the stick up forcefully either to generate speed or spin (depending on the pitch). When the stick has to travel from all the way down to all the way up, adding extra oomph decreases pitch accuracy precipitously in my experience.

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