Wood Bat Recommendations And Advice

SDS

Hello! I hope you're all doing well. I played with metal bats in high school, but never played competitively with wood bats. I want to buy a wood bat soon. If anyone on the forum can tell me about MLB bat taping rules, if there are any, and if Lizard Skins are a good idea or not, I would appreciate your feedback! I really want to practice hitting off a tee while the weather is nice. Also, if there are recommendations for wood bat weight and length depending on body type, please let me know.

SDS

It's been a few years since I played, and I was a pitcher. But I never bothered with Lizard Skins. Depending what level you're playing at, you'll go through wood bats relatively often. And taking Lizard Skins off is kind of a pain. Medical tape is good because it's disposable. IIRC, you can do whatever you want to the handle up until the label starts. Some bats have a solid line to mark the limit of tape or tar, too. I always just went with gloves and a little tar, personally.

As far as bat recommendations and body type, that really depends on what you're comfortable with. I have super long arms, so I'd stand further back in the box (because I could) and use a shorter (lighter) bat to cover the same amount of plate that someone with shorter arms couldn't so easily cover with a light bat.

I recommend starting off cheap. Don't waste your money on top end wood if you don't know what you're looking for yet. Wood bats are usually categorized by turning model, which is the general shape, taper, and balance of a bat. Turning models vary little between manufacturers. Go cheap, figure out what you like, and go from there would be my advice.

SDS

Lizard skins are the best bat grips, must have! I play year round competitive baseball as a middle schooler

SDS

SAM Bat Co. has pro overstock sales every so often, you can buy a bunch of bats for a good price. You pick the length but the weights and handles/knobs will vary slightly, but all the weights will be in legal range. I always just used Pine tar, but I had teamates who used the tennis wraps and liked them, that was before Lizard Skins was a thing.

SDS

Good advice about starting cheap given above. You’re going to break a bunch of bats.

When my kid first started in PBL, I got him ash Louisville Sluggers until he figured out what was best for him after that. Second year, he got a Sambat maple Miguel Cabrera model and that bat lasted through summer, fall ball, and broke finally in spring.

After that he went with the Louisville MLB Prime bats. I Highly recommend them, good value for the money.

SDS

I highly recommend getting a Louisville Slugger. In my opinion, they're the best bats money can buy. I've visited their factory & museum in Louisville, and I was very impressed. And since Louisville Sluggers have a long and storied history in baseball, you can't go wrong with such a classic.

SDS

@LankyRyan said in Wood Bat Recommendations And Advice:

It's been a few years since I played, and I was a pitcher. But I never bothered with Lizard Skins. Depending what level you're playing at, you'll go through wood bats relatively often. And taking Lizard Skins off is kind of a pain. Medical tape is good because it's disposable. IIRC, you can do whatever you want to the handle up until the label starts. Some bats have a solid line to mark the limit of tape or tar, too. I always just went with gloves and a little tar, personally.

As far as bat recommendations and body type, that really depends on what you're comfortable with. I have super long arms, so I'd stand further back in the box (because I could) and use a shorter (lighter) bat to cover the same amount of plate that someone with shorter arms couldn't so easily cover with a light bat.

I recommend starting off cheap. Don't waste your money on top end wood if you don't know what you're looking for yet. Wood bats are usually categorized by turning model, which is the general shape, taper, and balance of a bat. Turning models vary little between manufacturers. Go cheap, figure out what you like, and go from there would be my advice.

Thank you! Do you think a hitter's batting stance should affect the length of their bat? Ie, longer bat for hitter's who keep their hands further back (Albert Pujols as an example), and shorter bats for hitters who keep their hands closer to their chest? Thank you for the information about feet position in the batter's box, as well.

SDS

@Breadsticks21221 said in Wood Bat Recommendations And Advice:

Lizard skins are the best bat grips, must have! I play year round competitive baseball as a middle schooler

Do Lizard Skins affect or lessen the sting that hitters sometimes get on their hands after a batted ball?

SDS

@Hubijerk said in Wood Bat Recommendations And Advice:

SAM Bat Co. has pro overstock sales every so often, you can buy a bunch of bats for a good price. You pick the length but the weights and handles/knobs will vary slightly, but all the weights will be in legal range. I always just used Pine tar, but I had teamates who used the tennis wraps and liked them, that was before Lizard Skins was a thing.

Thank you! I want to learn about knobs, too. Are the bats with the flat cut at the bottom of the handle deemed within the rules of MLB? Or are the rounded and outward handles more common?

SDS

@BaseballWithBat5 said in Wood Bat Recommendations And Advice:

@Breadsticks21221 said in Wood Bat Recommendations And Advice:

Lizard skins are the best bat grips, must have! I play year round competitive baseball as a middle schooler

Do Lizard Skins affect or lessen the sting that hitters sometimes get on their hands after a batted ball?

I’m not sure since I have a cat 8 and there is almost no vibration. I’m just sure that it helps my grip on the bat to make it easier to swing and less tense on the hands

SDS

Also, what is assumed to be a heavier wood bat nowadays? I heard years ago that Babe Ruth used a 50 oz. bat. I don't know if that's true or not. The metal Red Line bats I used in high school were about 28-29 oz.

SDS

@BaseballWithBat5 said in Wood Bat Recommendations And Advice:

@LankyRyan said in Wood Bat Recommendations And Advice:

It's been a few years since I played, and I was a pitcher. But I never bothered with Lizard Skins. Depending what level you're playing at, you'll go through wood bats relatively often. And taking Lizard Skins off is kind of a pain. Medical tape is good because it's disposable. IIRC, you can do whatever you want to the handle up until the label starts. Some bats have a solid line to mark the limit of tape or tar, too. I always just went with gloves and a little tar, personally.

As far as bat recommendations and body type, that really depends on what you're comfortable with. I have super long arms, so I'd stand further back in the box (because I could) and use a shorter (lighter) bat to cover the same amount of plate that someone with shorter arms couldn't so easily cover with a light bat.

I recommend starting off cheap. Don't waste your money on top end wood if you don't know what you're looking for yet. Wood bats are usually categorized by turning model, which is the general shape, taper, and balance of a bat. Turning models vary little between manufacturers. Go cheap, figure out what you like, and go from there would be my advice.

Thank you! Do you think a hitter's batting stance should affect the length of their bat? Ie, longer bat for hitter's who keep their hands further back (Albert Pujols as an example), and shorter bats for hitters who keep their hands closer to their chest? Thank you for the information about feet position in the batter's box, as well.

Bat length to me was always more dependent on how far off the plate I stood, because that's what defines your max reach.

SDS

@LankyRyan said in Wood Bat Recommendations And Advice:

@BaseballWithBat5 said in Wood Bat Recommendations And Advice:

@LankyRyan said in Wood Bat Recommendations And Advice:

It's been a few years since I played, and I was a pitcher. But I never bothered with Lizard Skins. Depending what level you're playing at, you'll go through wood bats relatively often. And taking Lizard Skins off is kind of a pain. Medical tape is good because it's disposable. IIRC, you can do whatever you want to the handle up until the label starts. Some bats have a solid line to mark the limit of tape or tar, too. I always just went with gloves and a little tar, personally.

As far as bat recommendations and body type, that really depends on what you're comfortable with. I have super long arms, so I'd stand further back in the box (because I could) and use a shorter (lighter) bat to cover the same amount of plate that someone with shorter arms couldn't so easily cover with a light bat.

I recommend starting off cheap. Don't waste your money on top end wood if you don't know what you're looking for yet. Wood bats are usually categorized by turning model, which is the general shape, taper, and balance of a bat. Turning models vary little between manufacturers. Go cheap, figure out what you like, and go from there would be my advice.

Thank you! Do you think a hitter's batting stance should affect the length of their bat? Ie, longer bat for hitter's who keep their hands further back (Albert Pujols as an example), and shorter bats for hitters who keep their hands closer to their chest? Thank you for the information about feet position in the batter's box, as well.

Bat length to me was always more dependent on how far off the plate I stood, because that's what defines your max reach.

Okay. How long was the bat you used most often, and how long of a bat do you think your average teammate was using, comparitively?

SDS

@BaseballWithBat5 said in Wood Bat Recommendations And Advice:

Hello! I hope you're all doing well. I played with metal bats in high school, but never played competitively with wood bats. I want to buy a wood bat soon. If anyone on the forum can tell me about MLB bat taping rules, if there are any, and if Lizard Skins are a good idea or not, I would appreciate your feedback! I really want to practice hitting off a tee while the weather is nice. Also, if there are recommendations for wood bat weight and length depending on body type, please let me know.

So couple things. What type of baseball are you playing (I.e. level)? Is it a Sunday league type of thing or are you trying out for a JC that requires Wood bats. Second is I would suggest spending a little extra money on getting a composite wood bat first. These bats rarely break and are a great tool for players that are learning how to swing wood. Similar feel and reaction to wood, but less of a chance of breaking 5-6 before you get a feel for swinging a wood bat. Second the average size bat for college players is 33/30, if your shorter and smaller a 32/29 would work and if your taller and stronger a 34/31. Don’t go over 34 inches because it’s a waste.

Mlb rules for tape is the same at any level and the same rules for pine tar. I believe it’s 18” from the knob of the bat is legal and if it goes past it’s illegal. Home plate is generally the measuring tool (great example is look at George Brett go crazy cause he was ruled out for too much pine tar)

Lizard skins are very nice and are a good way for people to transition from metal to wood as pretty much everyone uses grip tape for metal bats. In terms of stinging your hands, lizard skins come in different thicknesses and it’s determined on how you like to feel the bat in your hands (thinner grips thinner handle, and vise versa)

For specific wood bats it’s all about feel and swing type. All of the top manufacturers use good quality wood and most of them now come with the mlb dot test to check the grain. Two popular models for bats are 243 and 271. 243 is a bat designed to be end loaded with a thinner handle and thicker barrel where as the 271 is a little more balanced focused. But there are many other models out there it just depends on your strength, swing speed, and what feels comfortable to you.

SDS

@CCCStunna30 said in Wood Bat Recommendations And Advice:

@BaseballWithBat5 said in Wood Bat Recommendations And Advice:

Hello! I hope you're all doing well. I played with metal bats in high school, but never played competitively with wood bats. I want to buy a wood bat soon. If anyone on the forum can tell me about MLB bat taping rules, if there are any, and if Lizard Skins are a good idea or not, I would appreciate your feedback! I really want to practice hitting off a tee while the weather is nice. Also, if there are recommendations for wood bat weight and length depending on body type, please let me know.

So couple things. What type of baseball are you playing (I.e. level)? Is it a Sunday league type of thing or are you trying out for a JC that requires Wood bats. Second is I would suggest spending a little extra money on getting a composite wood bat first. These bats rarely break and are a great tool for players that are learning how to swing wood. Similar feel and reaction to wood, but less of a chance of breaking 5-6 before you get a feel for swinging a wood bat. Second the average size bat for college players is 33/30, if your shorter and smaller a 32/29 would work and if your taller and stronger a 34/31. Don’t go over 34 inches because it’s a waste.

Mlb rules for tape is the same at any level and the same rules for pine tar. I believe it’s 18” from the knob of the bat is legal and if it goes past it’s illegal. Home plate is generally the measuring tool (great example is look at George Brett go crazy cause he was ruled out for too much pine tar)

Lizard skins are very nice and are a good way for people to transition from metal to wood as pretty much everyone uses grip tape for metal bats. In terms of stinging your hands, lizard skins come in different thicknesses and it’s determined on how you like to feel the bat in your hands (thinner grips thinner handle, and vise versa)

For specific wood bats it’s all about feel and swing type. All of the top manufacturers use good quality wood and most of them now come with the mlb dot test to check the grain. Two popular models for bats are 243 and 271. 243 is a bat designed to be end loaded with a thinner handle and thicker barrel where as the 271 is a little more balanced focused. But there are many other models out there it just depends on your strength, swing speed, and what feels comfortable to you.

Thank you! What does JC stand for? I'm not playing any baseball right now. I am thinking about trying out for a competitive men's league of some kind in a few years. In the meantime, I want to continue weights and cardio, and likely see a baseball instructor to train all 5 tools, and pitching.

I want to keep the equipment I get by the book. Thank you for the recommendation on composite bats. I will have to look into those.

Around 1999 or 2000, I'm pretty sure new regulations were put in place at high school or college levels that restricted bat barrels of 2.75 inches or larger. Is that right, or was that just the high school and college barrel rule to begin with?

SDS

@BaseballWithBat5 said in Wood Bat Recommendations And Advice:

Thank you! What does JC stand for? I'm not playing any baseball right now. I am thinking about trying out for a competitive men's league of some kind in a few years. In the meantime, I want to continue weights and cardio, and likely see a baseball instructor to train all 5 tools, and pitching.

I want to keep the equipment I get by the book. Thank you for the recommendation on composite bats. I will have to look into those.

Around 1999 or 2000, I'm pretty sure new regulations were put in place at high school or college levels that restricted bat barrels of 2.75 inches or larger. Is that right, or was that just the high school and college barrel rule to begin with?

JC is junior college/community college. The best thing to do is look up a league you may try out for and see what bat restrictions there are. Many adult leagues allow composite and bamboo bats, while a few do not and only allow traditional wood.

Your right the bat regulations changed for high school and college, but there’s no reason to worry about barrel size because all of the bats need to be a certain certification. Currently the certification for metal bats is BBCOR but it was previously BESR. In high school or college your not allowed to use a bat that doesn’t have the BBCOR certification on it, so that eliminates having to worry about using an illegal bat.

For wood you don’t really have to worry about it because all of the major manufacturers make their bats within Mlb guidelines, unless otherwise stated. Also I don’t believe having an oversized barrel for wood is a good thing because if they don’t increase the handle size it will probably end up breaking too easily due to too much pressure on the taper part of the bat

SDS

I'm a lazy piece of [censored] that got tired just reading this, I have no advice to give you.

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