Is there an easy way to ....

SDS

See what type of hitter a player card is ? Without have to load up a game. I know in game it tells me what type .... push , pull , balanced , power and so on.

Also can a player be balanced and a pull hitter ? But balanced would be only thing listed.

Also, if you most of the time late on swings online. What type of batter should you be using and what type to avoid to compensate for being late on swings

SDS

I think 'Balanced' refers to the balance between contact and power. I've normally only seen it when a batter is up and you press R2 it'll say either 'Contact', 'Balanced' or 'Power'. Equally though, they may change depending on if it's a RHP or LHP on the mound, as they may have good balanced ratings against RHP but be power only against lefties, for example.

SDS

@CalisGW said in Is there an easy way to ....:

See what type of hitter a player card is ? Without have to load up a game. I know in game it tells me what type .... push , pull , balanced , power and so on.

Also can a player be balanced and a pull hitter ? But balanced would be only thing listed.

Also, if you most of the time late on swings online. What type of batter should you be using and what type to avoid to compensate for being late on swings

  1. No, as far as I’m aware you have to stop the game to see a batters tendencies.

  2. Yes, a balanced hitter can be a pull hitter. A good example would be 99 Trout vs LHP. He’s balanced, due to his contact and power ratings, but his batting tendency is extreme pull. The two are distinct from one another.

  3. This seems like a simple, straightforward question. Sadly, due to the very nature of the game, the answer is somewhat ambiguous. As a basic guide, a power hitter with an extreme pull tendency should benefit most from swinging early with the square button, while a contact hitter with a balanced tendency ought to get maximum benefit from a well timed swing with the circle button.

However - there is nothing to say that this is the only route to success. A lot of pull hitters are going to be hit with the auto shift, which is irrelevant if the ball is going 400ft into the stands, but does tend to play when the ball is on the ground. In this case, swinging late against the shift is going to be effective if you’re not going yard. Additionally, there are no opposite field tendency hitters that I can think of personally, so if that’s your plan, you’ll struggle to find cards to fit the criteria. In this scenario, I’d look for balanced as opposed to extreme pull, these hitters can hit the ball to all fields effectively.

Finally, as you seem to be aware of your swing timing being slightly slower than ideal, why not approach the AB situationally and try to use it to your advantage? We touched on hitting against the shift earlier, but with runners on this becomes moot. What I would try to do in your shoes, is lay off inside pitches altogether, particularly when facing a same handed pitcher, as these require the greatest bat speed to get the bat around and drive the ball successfully. Look instead for hanging off speed and harder pitches away, on the outer half of the plate, where being slightly late is actually optimal timing. This should produce more hits up the middle and opposite field power.

SDS

@SJR15ITFC said in Is there an easy way to ....:

Equally though, they may change depending on if it's a RHP or LHP on the mound, as they may have good balanced ratings against RHP but be power only against lefties, for example.

Correct. They do change based on the pitcher

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